NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills

This is a sample of NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills.

NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills

Medication errors are a crucial issue in healthcare systems, posing significant risks to patient safety. Communication failures, improper dosing, and pharmaceutical interactions are all potential causes of these errors. My interest in this topic is because it has a direct influence on patient well-being. My professional experience has highlighted the importance of meticulous medication management practices, emphasizing the need for robust systems, interdisciplinary collaboration, and ongoing education to prevent errors and ensure optimal patient care.

Peer-reviewed Journal Articles Relevant to Medication Errors (NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills)

Numerous peer-reviewed journal articles, available through several databases such as the Capella University Library, BioMed Central, Science Direct, Google Scholar, CINAHL, and PubMed, provide significant insights into medication errors and ways for reducing them. To find relevant articles, I used targeted keywords such as “medication errors,” “medication safety,” and “medication administration” in my search.

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The papers included in the annotated bibliography are recent publications that highlight the most current advances in managing drug mistakes in healthcare settings. These articles contain current information and expertise required for properly recognizing and addressing drug mistakes. By focusing on recently published research, the annotated bibliography hopes to provide insights into current practices and interventions to improve pharmaceutical safety and patient outcomes.

Assessing the Credibility and Relevance of Academic Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles (NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills)

The credibility of information source resources discovered during an academic search for peer-reviewed research on medication errors, as well as their relative relevance for healthcare practice directions, are critical considerations to consider when determining their use eligibility. It is important to determine whether the source is from a peer-reviewed publication composed of academic experts and has been demonstrated to be worth these experts’ time to examine the study. Furthermore, since current items and information evolve, one of the most significant measures is to analyze the relationship between factuality and dates regularly. I want to capture the most recent advances and insights concerning pharmaceutical mistakes and associated prevention methods by selecting newly published journals. 

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Annotated Bibliography (NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills)

Manias, E., Kusljic, S., & Wu, A. (2020). Interventions to reduce medication errors in adult medical and surgical settings: A systematic review. Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety11(1), 1–29. https://doi.org/10.1177/2042098620968309

This article seeks to provide a broad overview of several strategies that can be used to address the issue of medication errors in hospital settings. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review to discover which approaches are effective in reducing medication errors. These strategies include barcode medicine administration, electronic prescription systems, pharmacist-led medication reconciliation, and staff training initiatives. The report evaluates the benefits and drawbacks of the strategies while also giving recommendations on how to implement medication safety procedures statewide.

This article is incorporated because it displays an all-around evaluation of evidence-based decisions to solve medication errors, which are of primary concern to healthcare personnel seeking to improve patient safety in a variety of hospital settings. According to the authors, technology, interdisciplinary interaction, and continual education are critical components of an integrated approach in healthcare settings; they can help identify medication errors and improve patient outcomes.

Killin, L., Hezam, A., Anderson, K. K., & Welk, B. (2021). Advanced medication reconciliation: A systematic review of the impact on medication errors and adverse drug events associated with transitions of care. The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety47(7), 438–451. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcjq.2021.03.011

The current study aims to investigate the effect of medication reconciliation approaches in reducing Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) among elderly patients. The author carefully investigated the effectiveness of medication reconciliation in reducing adverse drug events (ADEs) by conducting a comprehensive review and meta-analysis of research supplied by diverse authors. The findings indicate that medication reconciliation reduces the rate of ADEs in senior patients, making it critical to assure drug safety in this high-risk population.

This article is favored because it addresses the intervention of medication errors in geriatric care and provides a significant influencing element on mediation reconciliation strategies for reducing ADEs in adults. The authors argue that evidence-based medication reconciliation interventions are extremely beneficial in preventing ADEs in the elderly. That is why such a procedure must be implemented across the healthcare system allocating resources and services to older persons.

Schroers, G., Ross, J. G., & Moriarty, H. (2020). Nurses’ perceived causes of medication administration errors: A qualitative systematic review. The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety47(1). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcjq.2020.09.010

This qualitative study intends to investigate nurses’ opinions of variables that contribute to medication errors in acute care settings. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with nurses to learn about their perspectives on the variables that contribute to medication errors. Thematic analysis identified a variety of themes, including communication failures, workload constraints, insufficient training, and system-level concerns, giving light to the complexities of medication errors in acute care facilities. This article is included because it is relevant to understanding the underlying variables leading to medication errors from the perspective of frontline healthcare workers, and it provides significant insights for establishing focused treatments and strategies to improve medication safety. 

Shahmoradi, L., Safdari, R., Ahmadi, H., & Zahmatkeshan, M. (2021). Clinical decision support systems-based interventions to improve medication outcomes: A systematic literature review on features and effects. Medical Journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran35(27). https://doi.org/10.47176/mjiri.35.27

 This scoping review aims to explore the role of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) in preventing medication errors across healthcare settings. The researchers conducted a scoping review to investigate the use and effectiveness of CDSS in preventing medication errors. The findings emphasize CDSS’s potential to improve medication safety by providing healthcare professionals with real-time decision assistance, drug interaction alerts, and dosage estimates, reducing the possibility of errors.

This article (NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills) is included because it is relevant to evaluating the effectiveness of CDSS in minimizing medication mistakes and provides insights into technology initiatives targeted at improving medication security in various healthcare settings. The authors find that CDSS has the potential to significantly reduce medication errors by providing clinicians with decision support tools and alerts; however, more research is required to optimize their design and integration into clinical workflows for maximum effectiveness.

Insights from an Annotated Bibliography on Medication Errors (NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills)

Developing an annotated bibliography on medication errors has supplied useful information about this crucial healthcare issue. Throughout the process, I learned the importance of citing academic peer-reviewed articles as reputable sources, guaranteeing their validity and relevance to the issue. Key findings from the research’s results include the prevalence of medication errors in healthcare, the efficacy of various interventions such as medication reconciliation and clinical decision support systems in reducing errors, and the relevant factors revealed through qualitative research.

The selected sources make significant contributions in terms of evidence-based insights, empirical data, and practical advice for dealing with drug mistakes. Collectively, these findings increase understanding of medication safety procedures and highlight the necessity of ongoing research and collaboration in enhancing patient safety in healthcare settings.

References (NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills)

NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills: Killin, L., Hezam, A., Anderson, K. K., & Welk, B. (2021). Advanced medication reconciliation: A systematic review of the impact on medication errors and adverse drug events associated with transitions of care. The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety47(7), 438–451. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcjq.2021.03.011

NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills: Manias, E., Kusljic, S., & Wu, A. (2020). Interventions to reduce medication errors in adult medical and surgical settings: A systematic review. Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety11(1), 1–29. https://doi.org/10.1177/2042098620968309

NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills: Schroers, G., Ross, J. G., & Moriarty, H. (2020). Nurses’ perceived causes of medication administration errors: A qualitative systematic review. The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety47(1). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcjq.2020.09.010

NHS FPX 4000 Assessment 2 Applying Research Skills: Shahmoradi, L., Safdari, R., Ahmadi, H., & Zahmatkeshan, M. (2021). Clinical decision support systems-based interventions to improve medication outcomes: A systematic literature review on features and effects. Medical Journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran35(27). https://doi.org/10.47176/mjiri.35.27

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