NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination

Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination

Hi, my name is ________, and I am here to present ethical and policy factors in care coordination (NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination) regarding the American Heart Association. 

The contents of the presentation are as follows:

  • Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination
  • Governmental Policies Regarding Health Concerns
  • Specified Policies
  • National, State, and Local Policy Provision
  • Arguments for Ethical Implications
  • Nursing Code of Ethics
  • Social Determinants of Health
  • Conclusion
  • References

Care coordination is greatly influenced by ethical and policy considerations, which guarantee the provision of excellent, patient-centered care while respecting moral standards and legal requirements. Healthcare professionals make judgments based on ethical principles that value patient autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice (Roger et al., 2020). A nonprofit organization, the American Heart Association (AHA) works to prevent heart disease and stroke while also promoting cardiovascular health.

The American Heart Association (AHA) works to help people with heart diseases, increase awareness, and enhance cardiovascular health outcomes via education, advocacy, and research efforts (American Heart Association, 2023). This promotes collaboration and trust among stakeholders. Policy frameworks outlining roles, best practices, and legal obligations offer an organized method for coordinating care and encourage uniformity and responsibility in healthcare provision (Kitko et al., 2020). In concert, ethical and policy elements provide a framework that upholds individual rights, encourages fair access to treatment, and improves the efficacy and efficiency of care coordination initiatives, eventually leading to better patient outcomes and satisfaction.

Also Check:
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Governmental Policies Regarding Health Concerns

The Public Health Service Act and the Affordable Treatment Act (ACA) are two government health and safety rules that significantly impact how treatment is coordinated within a community. These policies establish the legislative framework that governs the activities of healthcare professionals’ activities (Henry et al., 2021). They establish policies, procedures, and standards that guarantee the provision of secure and efficient healthcare. For example, organizations like the American Heart Association (AHA) (Isselbacher et al., 2022).

AHA focuses on cardiovascular health and advocates regulations that mandate public health measures like vaccination programs or disease surveillance systems. They influence the methods and goals of care coordination initiatives, focusing on early intervention techniques and preventative measures while dealing with heart disease and stroke (Sims et al., 2020). Furthermore, access to cardiovascular care and resource allocation are directly impacted by healthcare finance, reimbursement, and insurance coverage regulations.

They have an impact on the accessibility and cost of services for members of the community who have cardiac problems (Sawyer et al., 2020). For example, government rules governing accountable care organizations and telemedicine services can also influence the composition and dynamics of care coordination networks for patients with cardiovascular disease (Maddox et al., 2020). They encourage cooperation between healthcare organizations to maximize patient outcomes and offer all-encompassing assistance (Kumar et al., 2020). Government health and safety policies, as well as groups such as the American Heart Association, have a significant role in determining how care coordination for patients receiving cardiovascular health treatment is shaped. It assists in directing procedures, assigning funds, and advancing the community’s well-being.

Specified Policies

The American Heart Association’s initiatives and other policies have a significant impact on care coordination efforts in the field of cardiovascular health. Government regulations requiring preventive health programs, for example, make it easier to identify and treat heart disease and stroke early on, which aligns with the Association’s mission (Kumar et al., 2020).

Health insurance coverage policies guarantee access to necessary cardiovascular treatments, such as screenings and prescription drugs, and facilitate seamless care coordination without financial obstacles. Examples of these policies are included in the Affordable Care Act (Damluji et al., 2020). Patient health information is protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). To protect patient data and foster confidence in healthcare interactions, it is imperative that confidentiality in the treatment of cardiovascular health be respected in accordance with the privacy guidelines maintained by the American Heart Association (AHA) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2022).  

Regulations controlling telemedicine services also provide access to follow-up treatment and cardiac consultations, which is especially helpful in rural locations (Streed et al., 2021). Accountable Care Organization creation policies encourage teamwork in care delivery, improving coordination among medical professionals to provide complete, individualized cardiovascular care (Sims et al., 2020). Together, these regulations influence the field of care coordination, promoting prompt interventions, fair access, and better results for people with cardiovascular diseases.

National, State, and Local Policy Provision

Care coordination in cardiovascular health presents significant ethical considerations that national, state, and municipal policy provisions present. One important national initiative that attempts to improve access to healthcare services is the Affordable Care Act (ACA). But moral conundrums will exist if there are differences in coverage and availability, especially in underprivileged groups (Roger et al., 2020). This calls into question the justice and fairness of care coordinating initiatives.

Furthermore, while telemedicine regulations increase access to treatment, they also raise ethical questions about patient privacy, the standard of care, and fair access to technology-dependent services, particularly for underserved or rural populations (Kitko et al., 2020). Because state-by-state eligibility requirements differ, Medicaid expansion rules at the state level make care coordination even more difficult. Even if expansion increases coverage for many, discrepancies might remain, making it difficult to coordinate care for others who might not be covered—those with cardiovascular diseases (Isselbacher et al., 2022). These differences raise moral concerns regarding distributive justice and the duty to be treated equally regardless of a patient’s location or socioeconomic background. 

Care coordination also presents ethical challenges for local regulations, such as those controlling hospital admissions and discharge procedures. Patient outcomes and well-being can be directly impacted by decisions about follow-up care access, hospital stay duration, and resource allocation (Henry et al., 2021). The equitable allocation of resources, patient liberty in making decisions, and all-encompassing care after discharge raise ethical concerns.

Cardiovascular care coordination faces ethical problems from federal, state, and local policies such as Medicaid expansion and the Affordable Care Act. They bring up issues of justice and fairness, especially for marginalized communities. In keeping with the goal of the American Heart Association, which is to promote cardiovascular health for all, this highlights the significance of equal access to healthcare services.

Arguments for Ethical Implications

Certain policy measures concerning cardiovascular treatment coordination have extensive and complex ethical ramifications. Although programs like Medicaid expansion and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) seek to increase access to healthcare services, ongoing differences in coverage and access, particularly for underprivileged groups, raise questions about justice and fairness (Maddox et al., 2020). Policies about telemedicine also present moral conundrums about patient privacy, healthcare quality, and fair access to services that rely on technology (Sawyer et al., 2020).

The ethical tenets of beneficence, fairness, and patient autonomy are called into question by these discrepancies and concerns, underscoring the necessity for legislative solutions that put patient welfare, high-quality healthcare, and equal access first (Kumar et al., 2020). If these ethical ramifications are not addressed, policy regulations run the risk of upholding the core values of healthcare ethics and sustaining inequality. Legislators must carefully evaluate the ethical implications of legislative provisions to provide fair, patient-centered care for all people with cardiovascular diseases.

Nursing Code of Ethics

In cardiovascular health, the American Heart Association’s (AHA) programs are closely linked to the nursing code of ethics, which is a significant factor in shaping the coordination and continuity of care (Streed et al., 2021). As front-line healthcare professionals, nurses follow moral standards that govern their relationships with patients, coworkers, and the larger healthcare system (Sims et al., 2020).

The AHA aims to promote cardiovascular wellness and assist those suffering from heart disease and stroke is closely aligned with the code of ethics (Damluji et al., 2020). It strongly emphasizes concepts like patient advocacy, integrity, and accountability in the context of cardiovascular health. In accordance with this guideline, nurses give priority to patient-centered care, making certain that patients receive all-encompassing and compassionate assistance at every stage of the care process, from early identification and prevention to treatment and rehabilitation (Sawyer et al., 2020). 

The code of ethics also emphasizes the value of interdisciplinary cooperation and communication, critical components of efficient care coordination for managing cardiovascular disorders. To create and carry out comprehensive care plans specific to each patient’s requirements, nurses work with doctors, therapists, and community health workers (Henry et al., 2021).

The AHA and the code of ethics support this cooperative strategy since it improves patient outcomes, allows smooth transitions across care venues, and fosters continuity of care (Roger et al., 2020). In addition, the code of ethics directs nurses in resolving moral problems that could surface in cardiovascular care coordination, such as guaranteeing fair access to resources and standing up for the interests of marginalized groups. In collaboration with the AHA, nurses support laws and procedures that advance cardiovascular health equity.

Social Determinants of Health

In cardiovascular care coordination, addressing social determinants of health is crucial, as emphasized by the American Heart Association and the nursing code of ethics. Socioeconomic position, educational attainment, availability of nutritious food, and safe housing are examples of social determinants that substantially impact people’s cardiovascular health outcomes and their ability to receive necessary services (Isselbacher et al., 2022). People from poorer socioeconomic backgrounds could find it difficult to get diagnostic testing, timely treatment for cardiovascular problems, and preventative care. Nurses acknowledge the significant impact of these social factors on health disparities and work to address them in care coordination initiatives proactively driven by ethical principles and by the goal of the American Heart Association (Kitko et al., 2020). 

In addition to addressing the medical elements of cardiovascular health, they collaborate with interdisciplinary teams to establish complete treatment plans that consider social and environmental factors contributing to cardiovascular health disparities (Kumar et al., 2020). Nurses and organizations like the American Heart Association work to promote health equity and guarantee that everyone has access to equitable cardiovascular care and support services (Maddox et al., 2020). Nurses work regardless of socioeconomic status or background by fighting for laws and practices that address social determinants of health.

Conclusion – NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination

The confluence of healthcare laws, moral issues, and the initiatives of groups such as the American Heart Association greatly influence care coordination in cardiovascular health. The regulatory environment is shaped by governmental regulations, which control resource allocation and patient access. Ethical ideals guide healthcare workers in providing equitable, patient-centered treatment.

The significance of tackling social determinants of health is emphasized in the code of ethics for nurses, as these factors substantially influence health outcomes and service accessibility. Nurses and organizations such as the American Heart Association work to enhance cardiovascular care delivery for all people by working together and advocating for health equity. Healthcare professionals can contribute toward a future where cardiovascular care is provided by resolving policy gaps, promoting ethical practices, and addressing social determinants of health.

References

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: American Heart Association. (2023). American Heart Association . Www.heart.org. https://www.heart.org/

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022, June 27). Health insurance portability and accountability act of 1996 (HIPAA). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/phlp/publications/topic/hipaa.html

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Damluji, A. A., Forman, D. E., van Diepen, S., Alexander, K. P., Page, R. L., Hummel, S. L., Menon, V., Katz, J. N., Albert, N. M., Afilalo, J., & Cohen, M. G. (2020). Older adults in the cardiac intensive care unit: Factoring geriatric syndromes in the management, prognosis, and process of care: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 141(2). https://doi.org/10.1161/cir.0000000000000741

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Henry, T. D., Tomey, M. I., Tamis-Holland, J. E., Thiele, H., Rao, S. V., Menon, V., Klein, D. G., Naka, Y., Piña, I. L., Kapur, N. K., & Dangas, G. D. (2021). Invasive management of acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 143(5). https://doi.org/10.1161/cir.0000000000000959

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Isselbacher, E. M., Preventza, O., Hamilton Black III, J., Augoustides, J. G., Beck, A. W., Bolen, M. A., Braverman, A. C., Bray, B. E., Brown-Zimmerman, M. M., Chen, E. P., Collins, T. J., DeAnda, A., Fanola, C. L., Girardi, L. N., Hicks, C. W., Hui, D. S., Jones, W. S., Kalahasti, V., Kim, K. M., & Milewicz, D. M. (2022). 2022 ACC/AHA guideline for the diagnosis and management of aortic disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 80(24), e223–e393. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2022.08.004

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Joynt Maddox, K., Bleser, W. K., Crook, H. L., Nelson, A. J., Hamilton Lopez, M., Saunders, R. S., McClellan, M. B., & Brown, N. (2020). Advancing value-based models for heart failure. Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, 13(5). https://doi.org/10.1161/circoutcomes.120.006483

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Kitko, L., McIlvennan, C. K., Bidwell, J. T., Dionne-Odom, J. N., Dunlay, S. M., Lewis, L. M., Meadows, G., Sattler, E. L. P., Schulz, R., & Strömberg, A. (2020). Family caregiving for individuals with heart failure: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 141(22). https://doi.org/10.1161/cir.0000000000000768

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Kumar, R. K., Antunes, M. J., Beaton, A., Mirabel, M., Nkomo, V. T., Okello, E., Regmi, P. R., Reményi, B., Sliwa-Hähnle, K., Zühlke, L. J., & Sable, C. (2020). Contemporary diagnosis and management of rheumatic heart disease: Implications for closing the gap: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 142(20). https://doi.org/10.1161/cir.0000000000000921

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Roger, V. L., Sidney, S., Fairchild, A. L., Howard, V. J., Labarthe, D. R., Shay, C. M., Tiner, A. C., Whitsel, L. P., & Rosamond, W. D. (2020). Recommendations for cardiovascular health and disease surveillance for 2030 and beyond: A policy statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 141(9). https://doi.org/10.1161/cir.0000000000000756

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Sawyer, K. N., Camp-Rogers, T. R., Kotini-Shah, P., Del Rios, M., Gossip, M. R., Moitra, V. K., Haywood, K. L., Dougherty, C. M., Lubitz, S. A., Rabinstein, A. A., Rittenberger, J. C., Callaway, C. W., Abella, B. S., Geocadin, R. G., & Kurz, M. C. (2020). Sudden cardiac arrest survivorship: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 141(12). https://doi.org/10.1161/cir.0000000000000747

NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination: Sims, M., Kershaw, K. N., Breathett, K., Jackson, E. A., Lewis, L. M., Mujahid, M. S., & Suglia, S. F. (2020). Importance of housing and cardiovascular health and well-being: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, 13(8). https://doi.org/10.1161/hcq.0000000000000089Streed, C. G., Beach, L. B., Caceres, B. A., Dowshen, N. L., Moreau, K. L., Mukherjee, M., Poteat, T., Radix, A., Reisner, S. L., & Singh, V. (2021). Assessing and addressing cardiovascular health in people who are transgender and gender diverse: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 144(6). https://doi.org/10.1161/cir.0000000000001003

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