PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought

History and Influence of the New School of Thought

The school of thought in psychology (PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought) has produced ideas and beliefs on human intellect, performance, culture, environment, learning habits, and social interactions. Many new schools of thought have emerged in recent years, including environmental psychology, feminist psychology, African/Black psychology, behavioral genetics, and so on. This paper will discuss the historical development and influence of feminist psychology.

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Founding Figures, Events, and Ideas of the School of Thought

Feminist psychology is a field of psychology that emerged in the 1960s and 1970s as part of the most prominent feminist movement. It seeks to highlight the marginalization and discrimination of women in psychology and the community on a larger scale.

Founding figures

Jean Baker Miller, who wrote “Toward a New Psychology of Women.” in 1976, is one of the oldest and most important figures in feminist psychology. Nancy Chodorow, Carol Gilligan, Sandra Bem, and Mary Belenky were also key figures in the development of feminist psychology. 

Events

Betty Friedan’s proclamation in her book “The Feminine Mystique” in 1963 is widely regarded as the beginning of the feminist movement in the United States. This movement sparked an interest in examining women’s experiences and contributed to the development of feminist psychology. In 1973, the Association for Women in Psychology (AWP) was founded to provide a forum for feminist psychologists to collaborate and exchange their research.

Ideas

One of the main principles of feminist psychology is that gender is a social norm rather than a biological one. Feminist psychologists argue that gender obligations and potentials are taught via socialization and can vary across values and historical periods. Another important premise is that old psychological conceptions and procedures are biased toward males and do not adequately account for women’s experiences. Feminist psychologists seek to understand women’s experiences and viewpoints, as well as how bias and oppression affect women’s psychological health and well-being. They also promote a more cooperative and democratic approach to therapy, which involves acknowledging and valuing the customer’s abilities and empowering them to have an active role in their rehabilitation (Good Therapy, 2020).

PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought

Feminist psychologists have developed a number of unique ideas and methodologies aimed at understanding the experiences of women and other marginalized groups. For example, they have pioneered ideas of relational-cultural treatment that emphasize the importance of relationships and networks in mental health. They have also developed novel ways to investigate gender and power dynamics in interactive interactions (Alvarez & Lazzari, 2020). 

Furthermore, feminist psychology is an analytical and active field that questions old psychological ideas and techniques in order to achieve a more precise and inclusive knowledge of human psychology. It is guided by fundamental beliefs and ideas that emphasize social fairness, diversity, and the importance of associations and relationships in impacting individual and collective well-being.

Historical and Societal Influences

Various historical factors influenced the development of feminist psychology, including the women’s rights movement, second-wave feminism, and social and cultural changes in the 1960s and 1970s (Burkett & Brunell, 2019).

The most important influence on the development of feminist psychology was the women’s rights movement, which began in the late nineteenth century and continued into the twentieth century. The campaign aimed to defend equal rights for women, such as the freedom to vote, work, and pursue an education. This movement created a space for women to express their experiences and advocate for collective change. Feminist psychoanalysts used the concepts of movement and values to question outdated theories that ignored or diminished women’s experiences (Wikipedia Contributors, 2019).

The second-wave feminist movement, which emerged in the 1960s and 1970s, has had a significant impact on feminist psychology. This campaign stressed the issues, such as generative rights, equal pay, and the representation of women on social media. Feminist psychologists were influenced by the second-wave feminist movement’s emphasis on social justice and impartiality, and they attempted to confront sexism and gender disparities within the field of psychology (Dominguez, 2020).

The 1960s and 1970s saw significant social and economic changes that aided the development of feminist psychology. These variances included a surge in the counterculture movement, which questioned outmoded gender roles and encouraged individual expression. Feminist psychologists demonstrated these societal shifts by challenging psychology’s traditional beliefs, which typically promoted gender stereotypes and unfairness (Tabassum & Nayak, 2021).

Several cases that strongly support the historical investigation of feminist psychology involve the work of Carol Gilligan, who challenged the androcentric model of psychology by emphasizing the importance of connections and emotion in the development of women. Sandra Bem, for example, developed the Bem Sex-Role Inventory, which addressed the dual idea of gender by measuring individual gender attributes and behaviors on a continuum rather than as male or female (Tabassum & Nayak, 2021). 

How This School of Thought Guides Social Thinking

Feminist psychology is a way of understanding and expressing how gender and other societal disparities affect patients’ psychological health, behavior, and safety. Feminist psychologists study how cultural, ethnic, and economic factors interact with gender to shape people’s experiences and the larger community to which they belong (Bhandari, 2024).

One way feminist psychology influences collective thought is by challenging established gender roles and stereotypes. Feminist psychologists argue that gender obligations and stereotypes are socially constructed and frequently have negative consequences for people, particularly women (Bhandari, 2024). For example, the stereotype that females are sensitive and illogical might lead to their dismissal or lack of recognition in the workplace. Feminist psychology stimulates these preconceptions, allowing individuals to think critically about how genders and stereotypes influence their thoughts and behaviors.

Feminist psychology also emphasizes the need to consider intersectionality in collective thinking. Intersectionality refers to how many forms of dominance, such as discrimination, ableism, and homophobia, interact with gender to shape people’s lives. For example, a black woman would endure more discrimination and marginalization than a white woman or a black guy. Feminist psychology encourages people to consider the impact of social inequities on their lives by understanding the intersectionality of many types of domination (Bhandari, 2024). 

Feminist psychologists argue that universal inequities and discrimination are the root causes of many psychological health difficulties and other problems. This includes feminist psychology, which emphasizes the need for collective and ethical action in expressing these concerns. For example, feminist psychoanalysts may advocate for legislation that provides equal pay for female and male employment, an approach to generative healthcare, and fortifications against biased violence (Zakin, 2019).

Feminist psychology guides social thought by challenging old gender roles and stereotypes, emphasizing intersectionality, and supporting collective change. This can help to create a more equal and just community for all individuals, regardless of color, ethnicity, beliefs, or traditions Bhandari, 2020 and Zakin, 2019 are two reliable scientific publications that provide a clear explanation of feminist psychology by defending women’s rights and authority in the face of discrimination. 

Conclusion – PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought

Feminist psychology has influenced people’s attitudes and views, as well as brought about various changes to existing cultural structures by giving female community members equal chances. Gender discrimination and reduced rights have sparked many groups to promote women’s empowerment and protect women’s rights in the community. Numerous psychologists contributed significantly to the development of this framework for women’s rights.

References

PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought: Alvarez, A. R., & Lazzari, M. M. (2020). Feminist Mentoring and Relational Cultural Theory. Affilia, 31(1), 41–54. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886109915612512

PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought: Bhandari, M. P. (2024, March 6). Feminisms in Social Sciences. Www.intechopen.com; IntechOpen. https://www.intechopen.com/chapters/87093

PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought: Burkett, E., & Brunell, L. (2019). Feminism – The second wave of feminism. In Encyclopædia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/topic/feminism/The-second-wave-of-feminism

PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought: Dominguez, J. (2020, April 24). Feminist Anthropology. Anthropology. https://anthropology.ua.edu/theory/feminist-anthropology/

PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought: Good Therapy. (2020, September 15). Feminist Therapy. Goodtherapy.org. https://www.goodtherapy.org/learn-about-therapy/types/feminist-therapy

PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought: Tabassum, N., & Nayak, B. S. (2021). Gender Stereotypes and Their Impact on Women’s Career Progressions from a Managerial Perspective. IIM Kozhikode Society & Management Review, 10(2), 192–208. sagepub. https://doi.org/10.1177/2277975220975513

PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought: Wikipedia Contributors. (2019, February 6). Feminist theory. Wikipedia; Wikimedia Foundation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feminist_theory

PSYC FPX 4100 Assessment 4 History and Influence of the New School of Thought: Zakin, E. (2019, May 16). Psychoanalytic Feminism (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy). Stanford.edu. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/feminism-psychoanalysis/

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